Black and Indigenous

Garifuna Activism and Consumer Culture in Honduras
Author: Mark David Anderson
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 0816661014
Category: Social Science
Page: 290
View: 8188
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Garifuna live in Central America, primarily Honduras, and the United States. Identified as Black by others and by themselves, they also claim indigenous status and rights in Latin America. Examining this set of paradoxes, Mark Anderson shows how, on the one hand, Garifuna embrace discourses of tradition, roots, and a paradigm of ethnic political struggle. On the other hand, Garifuna often affirm blackness through assertions of African roots and affiliations with Blacks elsewhere, drawing particularly on popular images of U.S. blackness embodied by hip-hop music and culture. Black and Indigenous explores the politics of race and culture among Garifuna in Honduras as a window into the active relations among multiculturalism, consumption, and neoliberalism in the Americas. Based on ethnographic work, Anderson questions perspectives that view indigeneity and blackness, nativist attachments and diasporic affiliations, as mutually exclusive paradigms of representation, being, and belonging. As Anderson reveals, within contemporary struggles of race, ethnicity, and culture, indigeneity serves as a normative model for collective rights, while blackness confers a status of subaltern cosmopolitanism. Indigeneity and blackness, he concludes, operate as unstable, often ambivalent, and sometimes overlapping modes through which people both represent themselves and negotiate oppression.

Black Women in Politics

Demanding Citizenship, Challenging Power, and Seeking Justice
Author: Julia S. Jordan-Zachery ,Nikol G. Alexander-Floyd
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438470959
Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE
Page: 314
View: 5278
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Examines how Diasporic Black women engage in politics. This book explores how Diasporic Black women engage in politics, highlighting three dimensions—citizenship, power, and justice—that are foundational to intersectionality theory and politics as developed by Black women and other women of color. By extending beyond particular time periods, locations, and singular definitions of politics, Black Women in Politics sets itself apart in the field of women’s and gender studies in three ways: by focusing on contemporary Black politics not only in the United States, but also the African Diaspora; by showcasing politics along a broad trajectory, including social movements, formal politics, public policy, media studies, and epistemology; and by including a multidisciplinary range of scholars, with a strong concentration of work by political scientists, a group whose work is often excluded or limited in edited collections. The final result expands our repertoire of methodological tools and concepts for discussing and assessing Black women’s lives, the conditions under which they live, their labor, and the politics they enact to improve their circumstances. “Black Women in Politics offers a new perspective on Black women as political actors. Jordan-Zachery and Alexander-Floyd have assembled a stellar group of essays that speak to the broad experiences and concerns of Black women as political actors. Together, the essays present a compelling story of what we learn when we center Black women’s voices in policy debates, democratic theory, and notions of political leadership.” — Wendy Smooth, The Ohio State University

Rewriting the African Diaspora in Latin America and the Caribbean

Beyond Disciplinary and National Boundaries
Author: Robert L. Adams Jr.
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317850459
Category: Social Science
Page: 172
View: 8051
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This volume considers the African Diaspora through the underexplored Afro-Latino experience in the Caribbean and South America. Utilizing both established and emerging approaches such as feminism and Atlantic studies, the authors explore the production of historical and contemporary identities and cultural practices within and beyond the boundaries of the nation-state. Rewriting the African Diaspora in the Caribbean and Latin America illustrates how far the fields of Afro-Latino and African Diaspora studies have advanced beyond the Herskovits and Frazier debates of the 1940s. The book’s arguments complicate Herskovits’ insistence on Black culture being an exclusive reflection of African survivals, as well as Frazier’s counter-claim of African American culture being a result of slavery and colonialism. This collection of thought-provoking essays extends the concepts of diaspora and transnationalism, forcing the reader to reassess their present limitations as interpretive tools. In the process, Afro-Latinos are rendered visible as national actors and transnational citizens. This book was originally published as a special issue of African and Black Diaspora.

[email protected] in Movement

Critical Approaches to Blackness and Transnationalism in the Americas
Author: Petra R. Rivera-Rideau,Jennifer A. Jones,Tianna S. Paschel
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137598743
Category: Social Science
Page: 316
View: 3275
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Through a collection of theoretically engaging and empirically grounded texts, this book examines African-descended populations in Latin America and [email protected] in the United States in order to explore questions of black identity and representation, transnationalism, and diaspora in the Americas.

Land Grab

Green Neoliberalism, Gender, and Garifuna Resistance in Honduras
Author: Keri Vacanti Brondo
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 081659998X
Category: Social Science
Page: 240
View: 4762
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Land Grab is a rich ethnographic account of the relationship between identity politics, neoliberal development policy, and rights to resource management in Garifuna communities on the north coast of Honduras, before and after the 2009 coup d’état. The Garifuna are a people of African and Amerindian descent who were exiled to Honduras from the British colony of St. Vincent in 1797 and have long suffered from racial and cultural marginalization. Employing approaches from feminist political ecology, critical race studies, and ethnic studies,Keri Vacanti Brondo illuminates three contemporary development paradoxes in Honduras: the recognition of the rights of indigenous people at the same time as Garifuna are being displaced in the name of development; the privileging of foreign research tourists in projects that promote ecotourism but result in restricting Garifuna from traditional livelihoods; and the contradictions in Garifuna land-rights claims based on native status when mestizos are reserving rights to resources as natives themselves. Brondo’s book asks a larger question: can “freedom,” understood as well-being, be achieved under the structures of neoliberalism? Grounding this question in the context of Garifuna relationships to territorial control and self-determination, the author explores the “reregulation” of Garifuna land; “neoliberal conservation” strategies like ecotourism, research tourism, and “voluntourism;” the significant issue of who controls access to property and natural resources; and the rights of women, who have been harshly impacted by “development.” In her conclusion, Brondo points to hopeful signs in the emergence of transnational indigenous, environmental, and feminist organizations.

Ethnic Groups of the Americas

An Encyclopedia
Author: James Minahan
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610691636
Category: Social Science
Page: 411
View: 7115
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Intended to help students explore ethnic identity—one of the most important issues of the 21st century—this concise, one-stop reference presents rigorously researched content on the national groups and ethnicities of North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean.

From Boas to Black Power

Racism, Liberalism, and American Anthropology
Author: Mark Anderson
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 1503607887
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 915
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From Boas to Black Power investigates how U.S. cultural anthropologists wrote about race, racism, and "America" in the 20th century as a window into the greater project of U.S. anti-racist liberalism. Anthropology as a discipline and the American project share a common origin: their very foundations are built upon white supremacy, and both are still reckoning with their racist legacies. In this groundbreaking intellectual history of anti-racism within twentieth-century cultural anthropology, Mark Anderson starts with the legacy of Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict and continues through the post-war and Black Power movement to the birth of the Black Studies discipline, exploring the problem "America" represents for liberal anti-racism. Anderson shows how cultural anthropology contributed to liberal American discourses on race that simultaneously bolstered and denied white domination. From Boas to Black Power provides a major rethinking of anthropological anti-racism as a project that, in step with the American racial liberalism it helped create, paradoxically maintained white American hegemony. Anthropologists influenced by radical political movements of the 1960s offered the first sustained challenge to that project, calling attention to the racial contradictions of American liberalism reflected in anthropology. Their critiques remain relevant for the discipline and the nation.

(Lost) Tribes to Citizens

Lemba 'black Jews' Engage the South African State
Author: Noah Miralaine Tamarkin
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: 580
View: 2973
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Dissertation Abstracts International

The humanities and social sciences
Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Humanities
Page: N.A
View: 1132
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Creating a Global Garifuna Nation?

The Transnationalization of Race, Class, and Gender Politics in the Garifuna Diaspora
Author: Sarah Chon England
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Garifuna (Caribbean people)
Page: 798
View: 6529
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